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BC/XC anything but resort skiing.


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  • 7 months later...

Bromley's policy...

Uphill travel is permitted only from dawn until dusk provided it us conducted in compliance with the conditions in this policy. After dusk, use of the mountain is strictly off-limits and is considered trespassing. Bromley’s night security personnel will take note of all vehicle Information for people attempting to access the trails from dusk to dawn. This is in recognition of the real danger of skiing in poor lighting conditions and on trails with ongoing grooming and snowmaking. Bromley reserves the right to limit or restrict uphill access as conditions, terrain, or weather warrant. Dogs are not permitted. Please note, this is a recent revision to the policy, effective immediately, and due to misuse of our prior allowance of dogs as long as they were kept leashed and by your side.

Uphill ski access by foot, snowshoe or skis may occur on three routes from dawn to dusk, but is restricted to trail edges due to safety concerns. The three routes are:

  1.  Lower Twister → Upper Twister
  2.  Lower Thruway → Upper Thruway → Runaround 1
  3.  Lower Boulevard → Shincracker → Run Around 2 → Upper Thruway → Sunset Pass → Upper Twister

Stay clear of all snowmaking and snow grooming operations. Winch cable grooming may be in operation. Closed trails are off-limits. Please familiarize yourself with our Snow Report for information on open and closed terrain during operating hours. The snow report is not guaranteed to be 100% accurate, especially outside of normal lift hours, and trail openings/closures may occur at any time. It is not always obvious from the base of a trail if it is closed or open.

Before traveling uphill, you must obtain an uphill access season pass from the Bromley ticket office. The office staff will review the uphill policy with you and obtain your signature acknowledging compliance with Bromley’s uphill travel policy. The fee for the uphill pass is $20 per season if you do not own a season pass. If you own a season pass, the uphill pass is free. The pass must be worn on your arm while you are skinning up the mountain.

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Cool stuff ,Glad to see more people touring.  I had a long day did I miss a new member thread? 

I tour round Jim Thorpe area and Lehigh high valley  but last year had family health issue and missed most of the winter.

I've got some Marker Dukes on some old Rossis and Dynafit radicals on a pair of Nordica Hell & Back.

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On 10/27/2021 at 8:20 PM, AirheadD8 said:

Cool stuff ,Glad to see more people touring.  I had a long day did I miss a new member thread? 

I tour round Jim Thorpe area and Lehigh high valley  but last year had family health issue and missed most of the winter.

I've got some Marker Dukes on some old Rossis and Dynafit radicals on a pair of Nordica Hell & Back.

Welcome!!

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  • 1 month later...
  • 3 weeks later...

Lancaster this morning.  It isn't very thick and I had some trouble getting the right wax combo, the skiing on this should be better once it resolidifies tonight.20220107_091050.thumb.jpg.fa80bb44990aa3bf0e53c997bbef3ab6.jpg

Edited by abe
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  • 2 weeks later...

This new wintry mix is turning sloppy in Lancaster.  I had to ski it in da moonlight before the rain melts it away.  Wet and gliding surprisingly well on new tracks.

The previous snow had been skiiable until wednesday

20220116_222925.thumb.jpg.145840f9369e3e62cd74f9e5134cba52.jpg

Full🌝Moon

 

It would be cool if the ski areas around here continued the party a bit later until like midnight especially under the full moon. I know there are some xc operations that do that.

Edited by abe
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On 1/21/2022 at 3:06 PM, Dirtwolf said:

Looking to get a touring setup at some point in the near future.  Recommendations???

I guess it depends what you want to do. I'm not an expert on gear by any means, but I know on the Backcountry Touring in the Northeast Facebook group people list set ups fairly often. If I were to do it again I would but something used and then figure out what I liked before investing. I have Salomon Guardian frame bindings on my touring setup. They are definitely heavier than traditional touring bindings but for how often I do it there really isn't an issue.

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On 1/21/2022 at 3:06 PM, Dirtwolf said:

Looking to get a touring setup at some point in the near future.  Recommendations???

Some may disagree but I think the more important question is what do you want to do with it ? Mostly EC ? Slack or way out in the boonies type shit. Do you want to be a goat going up or hucking cliffs on the way down ? 

If you have a concept with want you want to do you can build out the rig.  EC dominant narrower and light but has to be 10000% bulletproof, shorter for getting around and slightly forgiving for when it's shit is my preference.

FAT softer surfy more slack rigs out west where it's almost always lifts and gates approach but that's what I want to do with them.  

The ski matters more than in resort skiing and people are way more particular about bindings.  I would say fondle some in the lot at blue or in a store and get an idea for how they are different in how the work, ramp angles, pivot points, burliness, heal lifters etc etc. Pick the one that meshes with the idea behind the ski that you like but certain ones are on the hype machine. Boots in my mind have to be comfortable because there is alot more going on than in resort skiing and if there is a hot spot your feet can get eaten up. 

 

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This is re: XC (not touring):

I use NNN-BC ("backcountry"). It is a slightly beefier version of the NNN ("New Nordic Norm" - the new click-in xc standard).  I find the regular NNN too flimsy to do well not in groomed tracks, of which there are none within a few hours drive (Closest place is Crystal Lake up by Muncy).  In an ideal groomed track NNN will allow a better kick and glide technique though.

I usually use metal edged waxless Rossignol BC65 positracks.  They do fit in set tracks but regular track skis are usually a bit narrower and dont have metal edges.  The metal edge really helps climb and descend any sort of slope, and they also have a very slight side cut.  These skis do very well for what I use them for, in our typically very marginal snow conditions on ungroomed rolling terrain.

I sometimes use a pair of old long and skinny Fischer race skis, those need to be waxed and work best if you already have a track laid in but they are fast! You can do a more legit kick and glide on those.  They had obsolete 1st gen SNS bindings or something which we replaced with NNN-BC when the boots fell apart and they have become much more stable.

Another option is 3 pin or 75mm duckbill boots which is what old school XC and telemark setups also usually use.  Depending on the boot and binding those can give good downhill control.

Edited by abe
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Thanks y'all for the input so far.  I should clarify a bit that this setup will be more geared toward adding another ski to the downhill quiver.  This ski will also open up the possibilities of some tame-ish backcountry up north/out west, inbounds resort uphill travel stuff, and the random time where I'd get the urge to go skin around some flat trails close to home.

For bindings I was looking into the Marker Duke PT or the Salomon Shift.  However, after some research and seeing indiggio's Markers yesterday morning I think I am leaning that way.  The Markers look way more robust for the main purpose of the ski.

For the skis I'm for sure not looking for big fatties because lets be honest... it's not dumping every day at Blue.  Kendo's are 88 under foot so thinking something slightly fatter maybe in the 95-100 underfoot range.  Also, not looking for something super light and flimsy because again, downhill in-bounds performance will be the main purpose.  

What about skins?

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4 hours ago, Dirtwolf said:

Thanks y'all for the input so far.  I should clarify a bit that this setup will be more geared toward adding another ski to the downhill quiver.  This ski will also open up the possibilities of some tame-ish backcountry up north/out west, inbounds resort uphill travel stuff, and the random time where I'd get the urge to go skin around some flat trails close to home.

For bindings I was looking into the Marker Duke PT or the Salomon Shift.  However, after some research and seeing indiggio's Markers yesterday morning I think I am leaning that way.  The Markers look way more robust for the main purpose of the ski.

For the skis I'm for sure not looking for big fatties because lets be honest... it's not dumping every day at Blue.  Kendo's are 88 under foot so thinking something slightly fatter maybe in the 95-100 underfoot range.  Also, not looking for something super light and flimsy because again, downhill in-bounds performance will be the main purpose.  

What about skins?

 

@Dirtwolf- Touring out West is interesting . . . You can do it at places like ABasin, Loveland and some other resorts. But touring the backcountry in Colorado can be pretty dangerous. If you do tour out west in the backcountry, I highly recommend sticking to a resort at first and then doing a class or hiring a guide. 

I have had 2 touring setups. I started touring while in Colorado because I wanted more of a workout at the resorts and wanted to venture into the backcountry with friends. While in CO, I did my AIARE avalanche level 1 and a few workshops. 

 

As for the setup..... 

 

My first setup was atomic century with dynafit TLT speed radicals. They're super lightweight. The ski has a waist of 100, which was better for touring in the Colorado backcountry.

    Atomic Century Ski: The ski was good for CO & UT. It had a bigger underfoot that helped in the powder. I would often ski at Berthoud Pass, RMNP, and around Breckenridge. 

    + Dynafit Speed Radicals: They're super lightweight. Some of my friends were into doing things like the Grand Traverse (where speed and weight matters). When I started, I was doing laps up Loveland. So in hindsight.. honestly .. I think I gravitated towards them more because everyone else around me recommended them. But I'm not winning any races or doing competitions. I prefer ease of use over the weight. 

 

My second setup, I got when I was in between Pennsylvania & Colorado.

    Salomon QST 85: I wanted a ski that could do touring but also be a better fit for the east coast. So, I went with a smaller underfoot. I use these skis most often at blue. Huge fan.

    + Salomon Shift Bindings: After the dynafit experience, I wanted a more traditional binding and prefer it over the speed radical. 

 

This video explains the difference between Marker & Salomon binding. In short, the video says the Marker is better for someone who is doing 80% resort / 20% backcountry. The Salomon is better for someone who is doing 50% resort / 50% touring. The Salomon is lighter than the Marker and because of that - Salomon tends to be a pricier option. They generally do the same thing. In the end, I chose the Salomon Shift binding because I was able to get a pro deal through a friend and it was the less expensive option.

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4 hours ago, Dirtwolf said:

What about skins?

Most people I know have G3 skins. They tend to be the most popular. 

I appreciate how it hooks on the ski. I've had mine going on 8+ years and they're still in great shape. 

 

And ... my final suggestion. 

 

Rent it. Try it first. It's not like every weekend is a backcountry kind of week in PA. 

If you find yourself in a place like Park City, you can rent a touring setup and get a feel for the different gear and then go touring at Park City after hours. White Pine Touring does rentals in Park City.  

If you find yourself in a place like Denver, you can rent a touring setup at BentGate Mountaineering and then tour up Loveland or ABasin. 

Hope that's helpful!

Edited by skiincy
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5 hours ago, Dirtwolf said:

Thanks y'all for the input so far.  I should clarify a bit that this setup will be more geared toward adding another ski to the downhill quiver.  This ski will also open up the possibilities of some tame-ish backcountry up north/out west, inbounds resort uphill travel stuff, and the random time where I'd get the urge to go skin around some flat trails close to home.

For bindings I was looking into the Marker Duke PT or the Salomon Shift.  However, after some research and seeing indiggio's Markers yesterday morning I think I am leaning that way.  The Markers look way more robust for the main purpose of the ski.

For the skis I'm for sure not looking for big fatties because lets be honest... it's not dumping every day at Blue.  Kendo's are 88 under foot so thinking something slightly fatter maybe in the 95-100 underfoot range.  Also, not looking for something super light and flimsy because again, downhill in-bounds performance will be the main purpose.  

What about skins?

My thought process was that I planned on poking around locally.  I wasn't going anywhere extreme, so I didn't need the top of the line, lightest possible setup money could buy.  
I was in need of new boots and early last Spring, rumors were that Full Tilt was going out of business (now it's known that the line is being absorbed by K2), so, knowing I wanted a touring setup, began looking for the FT Ascendants and found them cheap over the summer.  Full Tilt's always have worked for my feet, so it wasn't a big gamble.
Then I was searching for a ski that I could use at Blue and since it's typically ice/hard pack, I wanted something stiffer than my favorite Sick Days that are just too soft when it's brutal cold.  I wanted something that I could also ski the bumps on transition days, so something wider than my bump skis, but not crazy wide, hence the Black Crows Orbs.
The Marker bindings had become available, so I went looking for a package deal online and when I found a shop that had both, made an offer, they countered, I countered, eventually settling on $950 for both. 
Searched around for skins and again didn't want to spend a shit-ton for how often I was going to use the setup, so went with the G3s.   Still need to get around to cutting them.
I also ran across a pair of Black Crow Duo poles on sale over the summer, so I picked them up as well.

So far, so good with the Markers, at least in bounds at Blue and Whiteface. 
I made sure I can get into the tech binding and poked around the yard.   I definitely need practice!

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