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Sugarbush Advice

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Latest Plan is to Ski Mt. Ellen next Thursday $30 ticket, MRG Friday then Pico Saturday.  Is it worth paying full price $71to ski all Sugarbush or will Mt Ellen be enough for Intermediates and beginner trails for Family?  

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Well... Being that I patrol at Sugarbush, I may be able to lend some insight. Furthermore, as a volunteer patroller, I have the ability to choose which mountain I patrol at, and I exclusively choose Sugarbush North. That being said, here are my thoughts on North as a “family” mountain.

While $30 is a great deal, and we have lots of people who take advantage of it, the one thing North lacks is beginner terrain. The majority of the true beginner terrain is off of the Sunny Q lift, but it is really only Crackerjack. Graduation and Sugar Run are labeled as beginner runs, but Sugar Run has terrain features on it, and Graduation is typically ungroomed. If we head up the I, which likely won’t be open on Thursday, which means you would have to take GMX then traverse across Northway, Walt’s and Semi Tough are both labeled as green, but once again are ungroomed. If you go up GMX, the only green is North Star, which is a perfect green trail. However, lower North Star has a pretty steep pitch that throws beginners for a loop. Main Stream is a much mellower green trail, but all traffic funnels down it so it can get icy. Cruiser and Which Way are both off GMX as well, and are labeled Blue, but they are both mellow. I would rate them between a green and blue. They can both easily be skied by a lower level intermediate. If you decide to go up Summit or North Ridge, the only semi-green run that is labeled a blue along the lines of Which Way and Cruiser, is Rim Run. It has some pitches near the end, but overall is mellow. Looking good is also a good intermediate trail. I would only label it a blue because of consistent pitch and the lift towers. Elbow is also off North Ridge, but it is solidly in the intermediate category.

Overall, I would say that South gives you more overall options for true beginners, but if you ski/ride at a low intermediate level, then you can enjoy yourself at North. How many in your crew and what level skiers/riders are they?

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2 hours ago, Mess said:

Latest Plan is to Ski Mt. Ellen next Thursday $30 ticket, MRG Friday then Pico Saturday.  Is it worth paying full price $71to ski all Sugarbush or will Mt Ellen be enough for Intermediates and beginner trails for Family?  

Sugarbush is more of an expert mountain. If it’s intermediates stay south. There is literally one run from the summit of each mountain that is blue square and they are herb Routes. 

Edited by GrilledSteezeSandwich

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I’ll be up at the same time using Warren Miller vouchers, doing 2-3 days at sugarbush, hopefully  a day at MRG, maybe a tour or XCD if conditions permit.  Anyone know of any easy tours to check out? What’s their uphill polIcy? 

Moe you around and up for doing a tour with a newb?

 

Edited by mbike-ski
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My wife and son are going with me.  My wife generally can ski any intermediate trail at Mount Snow/Could probably do any groomed diamond trail but does not like to push herself. 12 year old son can ski all groomed trails and some bumps(more advanced than wife).  I prefer to stay away from bumps.  I really need to get a lesson.

We have skied Mount Snow, Okemo, Bromley, Stratton, Killington and Pico for about the last 10 years. I only get to do the diamonds when wife is taking a break in Lodge.  We always look forward to one trip to Vermont.  Love the atmosphere.

Thanks

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My wife and son are going with me.  My wife generally can ski any intermediate trail at Mount Snow/Could probably do any groomed diamond trail but does not like to push herself. 12 year old son can ski all groomed trails and some bumps(more advanced than wife).  I prefer to stay away from bumps.  I really need to get a lesson.
We have skied Mount Snow, Okemo, Bromley, Stratton, Killington and Pico for about the last 10 years. I only get to do the diamonds when wife is taking a break in Lodge.  We always look forward to one trip to Vermont.  Love the atmosphere.
Thanks

Just a little more information. Generally speaking, we don’t believe in grooming black diamonds at Sugarbush. We believe diamonds by definition have bumps. That being said, they will groom Stein’s, Ripcord, and Organgrinder at South on occasion, and very very rarely FIS at North.
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3 hours ago, mbike-ski said:

I’ll be up at the same time using Warren Miller vouchers, doing 2-3 days at sugarbush, hopefully  a day at MRG, maybe a tour or XCD if conditions permit.  Anyone know of any easy tours to check out? What’s their uphill polIcy? 

Moe you around and up for doing a tour with a newb?

 

IF you make it up to Smuggs, we can tour

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Are most of the Intermediates groomed?  Intermediates similar to Pocono Diamonds?

Edited by Mess

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Rhus Ovata or Sugarbush is an evergreen shrub to small tree that grows in chaparral in dry canyons and south-facing slopes below 1300 m in Southern California, Arizona and Baja California. Rhus ovata ranges in height from 2–10 m (6.6–32.8 ft) and it has a rounded appearance. The twigs are thick and reddish in color. Its foliage consists of simple, dark green, leathery, ovate leaves that are folded along the midrib. The leaf arrangement is alternate.

It blooms in April and May, and its inflorescences which occur at the ends of branches consist of small, 5-petaled, flowers that appear to be pink, but upon closer examination actually have white to pink petals with red sepals. Additionally, the flowers may be either bisexual or pistillate. The fruit is a reddish, sticky drupe, and is small, about 6 – 8 mm in diameter.

Rhus ovata looks similar to Rhus integrifolia, but Rhus ovata can be distinguished by its leaves generally being folded rather than flat and more pointed than blunt as compared with the leaves of Rhus integrifolia.

The main Rhus ovata population range is from the central and Pacific region Baja California north into Pacific coastal Southern California, and also in the central Arizona region of the Mogollon Rim. Rhus ovata prefers well-drained soil in a sunny location, with little water once established, being a very drought-tolerant plant. It does not respond to formal boxed pruning well; however, as needed for wildfire fuel reduction or rejuvenation, occasional autumnal cutting, down to above the base crown, is done for new basal sprouting.

My advice would be to pick another plant or perhaps think about growing indoors, Sugarbush are not a good choice for our climate and growing season.

 

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When I ride the castle rock chair at sugarbush I have the theme song to fraggle rock in my head..when on the heavens gate chair it reminds me of the heavens gate cult and sometimes I just as lib and sing the song, Do you you ski like I do..set to this song 

 

 

Edited by GrilledSteezeSandwich

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3 hours ago, moe ghoul said:

IF you make it up to Smuggs, we can tour

That certainly would be do-able, I'll PM you next week.

Mess if you want to PM me  your digits maybe we can do a run or beers

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